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Posts from the ‘Podcast’ Category

Rest & Sabbath

May 22nd, 2017

shaneblackshear

Christine Sine joins us and teach about resting in God’s presence.

 

  • What does it mean to rest?
  • What comes to mind when you hear the word rest?
    What scriptures do you think of?
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Easter 5 (2017.05.07 Sermon)

May 15th, 2017

shaneblackshear

John Chandler shares his hopes and desires for himself and the body of Austin Mustard Seed during his sabbatical.

 

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Easter 4 (2017.05.07 Sermon)

May 8th, 2017

John Chandler

Our friend Gideon Tsang, from Vox Veniae, joins us with a challenge to change our minds.

Quotes and resources mentioned:

  • When Jesus said, ‘(Change your minds),’ to his first disciples, he was calling them to change the direction in which they were looking for happiness. ‘(Changing our mind)’ is an invitation to grow up and become a fully mature human being. — Thomas Keating
  • Powerlessness is our greatest treasure. Don’t try to get rid of it. Everything in us wants to get rid of it. Grace is sufficient for you, but not something you can understand. To be in too big a hurry to get over our difficulties is a mistake because you don’t know how valuable they are from God’s perspective, for without them you might never be transformed as deeply and as thoroughly. — Thomas Keating
  • Vulnerability is the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity. It is the source of hope, empathy, accountability, and authenticity. If we want greater clarity in our purpose or deeper and more meaningful spiritual lives, vulnerability is the path. — Brene Brown
  • Maturity is not the hallmark of our culture. Our culture is conspicuous for its obsession with ‘getting and spending’. Instead of becoming more, we either get more or do more. So it is not surprising that many people are offering to sell us maps for living better than we are without having to grow up: maps to financial security, sexual gratification, music appreciation, athletic prowess, a better car, a better job, a better education, a better vacation. As it turns out, the maps never get us to where we wanted to go: the more we get and do, the less we are. — Eugene Peterson

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Easter 3 (2017.04.30 Sermon)

April 30th, 2017

John Chandler

April Karli invites us to the table found in Emmaus.

Quotes and resources mentioned:

  • Never suppose that God is more “there” than “here,” or more “then” than
    “now.” For the Father is always working—in all places, at all times, in all people. The steadfast love of God fills the entire earth (Psalm 33:15). — Greg Boyd in Present Perfect
  • The Eucharist is a profoundly communal meal that reorients us from people who are merely individualistic consumers into people who are, together, capable of imaging Christ in the world. Of course, eating itself reminds us that none of us can stay alive on our own. If you are breathing, it’s because someone fed you. We are born hungry and completely dependent on others to meet our needs. In this way the act of eating reorients us from an atomistic, independent existence toward one that is interdependent. But the Eucharist goes even further. In it, we feast on Christ, and are thereby mysteriously formed together into one body, the body of Christ. — Tish Harrison Warren in Liturgy of the Ordinary

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Easter 2 (2017.04.23 Sermon)

April 26th, 2017

John Chandler

Chris Morton shares about how Jesus meets people.

“The means of our communication needs to be gentle, because gentleness also characterizes the subject of our communication. What we are seeking to defend or explain is Jesus himself, who is a gentle, loving shepherd. If we are not gentle in how we present the good news, how will people encounter the gentle and loving Messiah we want to point to? And finally, in an age shaped by feuding intellectual commitments and cultural battles over religion, science, truth, and morality, how will we get a hearing by merely insisting that we have truth and reason on our side? Many have made these claims before us. Some in a spirit of aggression, some in fear, and some in arrogance. Our apologetic happens in a context, and that context is strewn with enmity, hostility, abuse, and other opposition, which ultimately contradict the very things our message lifts up. That is why our apologetic has to embody the message and person we want to communicate. Only with ‘gentleness and reverence’ will people be able to see, verify, and be persuaded to respond to what we have to say.”

Dallas Willard, The Allure of Gentleness

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Easter (2017.04.16 Sermon)

April 17th, 2017

John Chandler

John Chandler reminded us that, wherever we come from, it’s good for us to hear the Easter story again..

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • The trees are coming into leaf
    Like something almost being said;
    The recent buds relax and spread,
    Their greenness is a kind of grief.

    Is it that they are born again
    And we grow old? No, they die too.
    Their yearly trick of looking new
    Is written down in rings of grain.

    Yet still the unresting castles thresh
    In fullgrown thickness every May.
    Last year is dead, they seem to say,
    Begin afresh, afresh, afresh.
         — Philip Larkin

  • The resurrection life is a practice. It’s not something we practice like practicing musical scales or practicing our golf swing. It is practice in the more inclusive sense in which we say a physician has a practice—work that defines both his or her character and workday. — Eugene Peterson
  • Prototype, by Jonathan Martin

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Passion Sunday (2017.04.09 Sermon)

April 9th, 2017

John Chandler

John Chandler steered us toward Holy Week with a sermon on Matthew 27:27-56.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • The early Christians, the original friends of Jesus, so sympathized with Jesus’s pain and had been so traumatized by it that they could not bring themselves to depict the stark reality of his suffering, except in words—that is, in the accounts of the four gospels, which are as clipped and precise as the four authors knew how to make them. Only in the fifth century, nearly a century after the Roman state had discontinued the practice of crucifixion and no one living had witnessed such a procedure, did Christians forget the shame and horror of the event sufficiently to begin to make pictures of it. — Thomas Cahill
  • What if his prolonged silence and painful cry from the cross is really intended to call us toward a life of vocation and embolden us to stand in solidarity with those who suffer, so that anguished cries might cease? Maybe Jesus’ cry is not his alone, but a timeless cry on the behalf of millions of suffering people who have felt and will feel forsaken by God and humanity, lest someone answer their call. Perhaps his anguished cry is intended to touch us at the core of our being so that we, his present-day disciples, may remember his teachings and endeavor to live therein.– Veronice Miles

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Lent 4 (2017.03.26 Sermon)

March 26th, 2017

John Chandler

Mason Parva guided us through reading and reflection on John 9:1-12 for this fourth week of lent.

Art and poetry used:


the ARTWORSHIP project by Jamie and Jeremy Wells


“The Sorrowful Saint” by Scott Erickson.


the ARTWORSHIP project by Jamie and Jeremy Wells

Eucharist // Robert Deeble

Second round before the count,
the gloves went off, we both went down.
Blindsided by the distance you were just in reach.
I watched the towers fall on your TV.

Stumbling Hands and burning eyes,
we hold our own, then compromise
I just want to begin again,
I just want to live in our own skin.

I think it’s kind of strange,
we get so close we get estranged.
We get so close, we get estranged.

Forty days and forty nights,
Noah watched the river rise.
You flood again, I go for wood,
all our years misunderstood.

We get so close we get estranged.

Walk into mass, the ceilings high with loftiness
and lowered eyes.
The sound of choirs, a slow caress,
covers wounds my heart has dressed.

A Lover’s quarrel, all in duress,
I fold my arms for Eucharist
We fell in love – we got enmeshed,
bless me father I’m a mess…

Bless me father I’m a mess.

to grow deaf ears // Mason Parva

Days like today I awake to find
another beside me in my sheets,
who greets me and whispers into my ear
quiet words of unworthiness.

I toss to my side, blanketing face
to shield it from the sun,
pretend to have fallen back asleep
and never to have heard,
hoping to be left alone a little longer.

Outside the birds chirp all at once
As if none could wait to take its turn
to deliver an urgent message to me.
I listen and I hear it again –
murmured words of unworthiness.

In the kitchen the teapot cries
Like a boy with pavement on his elbow,
And the cabinets croak like weathered smokers,
And the dishes chink and meet together,
And the microwave hums
And the microwave pops
And the microwave beeps
And all I hear are words –
the same, sad words –
louder words of unworthiness.

At the window seat I spoon my oats
And watch a neighbor waddle outside,
hugging a heaping laundry bag to her chest,
leaving a trail of garments behind
lest she lose her way back home.
The spoon rings as I scrape it
against an empty bowl — gathering
remainders like a man gathers dropped
change at the bus station kiosk —
Ceramic and silver in a shouting match
raising words ever louder
painful, hurtful words,
of unworthiness.

I turn from the window to hide myself
and pause before I double
to wash the bowl without a faucet.
I cup my eyes like someone waiting
for permission to see a gift
Then wiping down to dry on my shirt
I hear myself join the chorus,
and aloud I am yelling words,
screaming all these words
of unworthiness.

I give it time before I stand
bowl and spoon drop in the sink —
cabinets slam —
blinds tumble —

I let them speak however they would.

Days like today I curse and wonder
If any places are silent places
If there is any great way to escape the noise,
the painful noise that comes with hearing

If ever a man could grow deaf ears,
for him who has ears
to learn not to hear

(words of unworthiness)

Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/1252682038/playlist/41sO3RsElJuNKuupBeeerR

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Lent 3 (2017.03.19 Sermon)

March 20th, 2017

Chris Morton

 

 

 
Chris Morton shared some thoughts on worshipping in Spirit and in truth.

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Lent 2 (2017.03.12 Sermon)

March 12th, 2017

John Chandler


Shane Blackshear continues our Lenten reflections with one of the most famous sections of the Bible.

Quotes and resources mentioned:

  • “…the Plan of Salvation can be preached apart from the story(of Israel). When the plan gets separated from the story, the plan almost always becomes abstract, propositional, logical, rational, and philosophical and, most importantly, de-storified and unbiblical. When we separate the Plan of Salvation from the story, we cut ourselves off the story that identifies us and tells our past and tells our future. We separate ourselves from Jesus and turn the Christian faith into a System of Salvation. | There’s more. We are tempted to turn the story of what God is doing in this world through Israel and Jesus Christ into a story about me and my own personal salvation. In other words, the plan has a way of cutting the story from a story about God and God’s Messiah and God’s people into a story about God and one person — me — and in this the story shifts from Christ and community to individualism.” -Scot McKnight, King Jesus Gospel
  • “It is ironic that America, with its history of injustice to the poor, especially the black man and the Indian, prides itself on being a Christian nation.” -James Cone
  • “I’m looking for a second reformation. The first reformation of the church 500 years ago was about beliefs. This one is going to be about behavior. The first one was about creeds. This one is going to be about deeds. It is not going to be about what does the church believe, but about what is the church doing.” — Rick Warren

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