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Posts from the ‘Podcast’ Category

Lent 4 (2017.03.26 Sermon)

March 26th, 2017

John Chandler

Mason Parva guided us through reading and reflection on John 9:1-12 for this fourth week of lent.

Art and poetry used:


the ARTWORSHIP project by Jamie and Jeremy Wells


“The Sorrowful Saint” by Scott Erickson.


the ARTWORSHIP project by Jamie and Jeremy Wells

Eucharist // Robert Deeble

Second round before the count,
the gloves went off, we both went down.
Blindsided by the distance you were just in reach.
I watched the towers fall on your TV.

Stumbling Hands and burning eyes,
we hold our own, then compromise
I just want to begin again,
I just want to live in our own skin.

I think it’s kind of strange,
we get so close we get estranged.
We get so close, we get estranged.

Forty days and forty nights,
Noah watched the river rise.
You flood again, I go for wood,
all our years misunderstood.

We get so close we get estranged.

Walk into mass, the ceilings high with loftiness
and lowered eyes.
The sound of choirs, a slow caress,
covers wounds my heart has dressed.

A Lover’s quarrel, all in duress,
I fold my arms for Eucharist
We fell in love – we got enmeshed,
bless me father I’m a mess…

Bless me father I’m a mess.

to grow deaf ears // Mason Parva

Days like today I awake to find
another beside me in my sheets,
who greets me and whispers into my ear
quiet words of unworthiness.

I toss to my side, blanketing face
to shield it from the sun,
pretend to have fallen back asleep
and never to have heard,
hoping to be left alone a little longer.

Outside the birds chirp all at once
As if none could wait to take its turn
to deliver an urgent message to me.
I listen and I hear it again –
murmured words of unworthiness.

In the kitchen the teapot cries
Like a boy with pavement on his elbow,
And the cabinets croak like weathered smokers,
And the dishes chink and meet together,
And the microwave hums
And the microwave pops
And the microwave beeps
And all I hear are words –
the same, sad words –
louder words of unworthiness.

At the window seat I spoon my oats
And watch a neighbor waddle outside,
hugging a heaping laundry bag to her chest,
leaving a trail of garments behind
lest she lose her way back home.
The spoon rings as I scrape it
against an empty bowl — gathering
remainders like a man gathers dropped
change at the bus station kiosk —
Ceramic and silver in a shouting match
raising words ever louder
painful, hurtful words,
of unworthiness.

I turn from the window to hide myself
and pause before I double
to wash the bowl without a faucet.
I cup my eyes like someone waiting
for permission to see a gift
Then wiping down to dry on my shirt
I hear myself join the chorus,
and aloud I am yelling words,
screaming all these words
of unworthiness.

I give it time before I stand
bowl and spoon drop in the sink —
cabinets slam —
blinds tumble —

I let them speak however they would.

Days like today I curse and wonder
If any places are silent places
If there is any great way to escape the noise,
the painful noise that comes with hearing

If ever a man could grow deaf ears,
for him who has ears
to learn not to hear

(words of unworthiness)

Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/1252682038/playlist/41sO3RsElJuNKuupBeeerR

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Lent 3 (2017.03.19 Sermon)

March 20th, 2017

Chris Morton

 

 

 
Chris Morton shared some thoughts on worshipping in Spirit and in truth.

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Lent 2 (2017.03.12 Sermon)

March 12th, 2017

John Chandler


Shane Blackshear continues our Lenten reflections with one of the most famous sections of the Bible.

Quotes and resources mentioned:

  • “…the Plan of Salvation can be preached apart from the story(of Israel). When the plan gets separated from the story, the plan almost always becomes abstract, propositional, logical, rational, and philosophical and, most importantly, de-storified and unbiblical. When we separate the Plan of Salvation from the story, we cut ourselves off the story that identifies us and tells our past and tells our future. We separate ourselves from Jesus and turn the Christian faith into a System of Salvation. | There’s more. We are tempted to turn the story of what God is doing in this world through Israel and Jesus Christ into a story about me and my own personal salvation. In other words, the plan has a way of cutting the story from a story about God and God’s Messiah and God’s people into a story about God and one person — me — and in this the story shifts from Christ and community to individualism.” -Scot McKnight, King Jesus Gospel
  • “It is ironic that America, with its history of injustice to the poor, especially the black man and the Indian, prides itself on being a Christian nation.” -James Cone
  • “I’m looking for a second reformation. The first reformation of the church 500 years ago was about beliefs. This one is going to be about behavior. The first one was about creeds. This one is going to be about deeds. It is not going to be about what does the church believe, but about what is the church doing.” — Rick Warren

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Into the Wilderness // Lent 1 (2017.03.05 Sermon)

March 5th, 2017

John Chandler


John Chandler invites us to embrace the wilderness that comes with the season of Lent.

Quotes and resources mentioned:

  • Lenten penitence engages the dark places in our lives that we may come face to face with them, name them, understand them, and seek forgiveness for them. It is not about guilt. It is about freedom from the control that our fears and insecurities have over us all, about the amendment of life and new beginnings. — Maryetta Anschutz
  • The tragedy for us, of course, is that we continually forget who we are. We catch a glimpse of our belovedness, but without the gift of the wilderness—those times of silence and solitude when we come face-to-face with ourselves and with God—it doesn’t always stick. So as we re-immerse ourselves in the world of flashing screens, buzzing smartphones, and competing voices, we’re prone to sliding back into doubt, discouragement, and disillusionment. We don’t always hear the voice of the devil as it sounds in the wilderness—disjointed, absurd, obvious, easy to detect against the sparse landscape of solitude. — Jonathan Martin

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Philippians 4:2-23 (2017.02.26 Sermon)

March 3rd, 2017

John Chandler

 

Chris Morton ties up our study of Philippians.

“Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things” Philippians 4:8

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Philippians 3:12-4:1 (2017.02.19 Sermon)

February 21st, 2017

John Chandler


John Chandler explains the Apostle Paul’s plan for how we can and will know the fullness of Christ.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • Chef’s Table
  • To live strongly and creatively in the kingdom of the heavens, we need to have firmly fixed in our minds what our future is to be like. We want to live fully in the kingdom now, and for that purpose our future must make sense to us. It must be something we can now plan or make decisions in terms of, with clarity and joyful anticipation. In this way our future can be incorporated into our life now and our life now can be incorporated into our future. — Dallas Willard in The Divine Conspiracy

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Philippians 3.1-11 (2017.02.12 Sermon)

February 13th, 2017

John Chandler

John Chandler, thanks to the apostle Paul, spent a great deal of time talking about circumcision and excrement.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • Saul clung to his zeal and force of will. Sounding like the prototypical Enneagram Type One that he was, after his conversion he described this as his desire to attain perfection by the strength of his efforts. What a relief it must have been for him to replace the perfection he had sought through hard work with “the perfection that comes through faith in Christ, and is from God”. — David Benner in The Gift of Being Yourself
  • But, like Paul, awareness of the flesh helps us understand how it can be a conduit for God’s purposes. For example, Paul used his status as a Roman citizen in to avoid a flogging and imprisonment (Acts 22:25-29). — MaryKate Morse in Making Room for Leadership
  • On Ramp podcast

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Philippians 2:12-30 (2017.02.05 Sermon)

February 6th, 2017

John Chandler

John Chandler took us to the halfway point in our trek alongside the Philippians.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • “But what does that mean? Work out our salvation? With fear and trembling? If we shrink salvation down to a ticket to heaven, Paul’s exhortation makes little sense. But if we understand salvation as Maximus the Confessor described it—“an entirely new way to be human”—then it makes perfect sense. Salvation is not securing a seat for the bus to heaven, but a thorough living out of resurrection implications. Paul is telling the Philippian Christians that, regarding their salvation, they are to work it out, walk it out, live it out—and to do so with fear and trembling. Why fear and trembling? Because what we have involved ourselves with in Christ is so utterly astonishing!” — Brian Zahnd in Beauty Will Save the World

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Jesus’ Path to Power: Philippians 1:27-2:18 (2017.01.29 Sermon)

January 31st, 2017

John Chandler

Chris Morton continues our discussion of Philippians.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • “Above all the grace and the gifts that Christ gives to his beloved is that of overcoming self.” Francis of Assisi
  • “When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” Teresa of Calcutta
  • “I know men and I tell you that Jesus Christ is no mere man. Between Him and every other person in the world there is no possible term of comparison. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, and I have founded empires. But on what did we rest the creation of our genius? Upon force. Jesus Christ founded His empire upon love; and at this hour millions of men would die for Him.” Napoleon Bonaparte

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Philippians 1:12-26 (2017.01.22 Sermon)

January 22nd, 2017

John Chandler


John Chandler played his history nerd card for a sermon on Philippians 1:12-26.

Quotes and links mentioned:

  • The Cult of Mithras
  • “The Christian message in this situation can be reduced to a simple formula: by virtue of his resurrection, Christ’s end in the catastrophe on Golgotha became the true beginning of his new life for us. His raising from the dead shows the divine power of beginning in the end.” — Jurgen Moltmann

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